50 Great Graphic Web design books you must try read..


What will dominate the world of digital design in 2017

1. Layouts that let content shine
The arrangement of design elements within a given structure should allow the reader to easily focus on the message, without slowing down the speed of his reading
–Hermann Zapf

The last few years have seen a sea change in how people view design’s role in business. Design has shifted from a late-in-the-process “optimization” stage where designers swooped in to sprinkle on some “pretty” like mystical fairy dust to a real competitive advantage.

It’s been an amazing evolution to watch.

And a fascinating element of that evolution has been the shift back toward a focus on content: the meat on the bones of the web. Designers worldwide have realized that people visit websites for their content — whether it’s raging tweetstorms, thoughtful long-reads, or the latest “user-generated” meme — and that design’s ultimate role is to present content in an intuitive, efficient, and “delightful” way.

That’s one reason for the shift away from skeuomorphic design toward “flatter,” more minimalist design approaches, as seen in Google’s Material aesthetic, and really, across the web and our various devices.

Of course, as Newton’s third law states, for every action, there’s an equal and opposite reaction. Many designers feel that the flat design trend has taken the “soul” out of design. We expect to see this conversation continue across 2017, but look forward to it becoming a productive dialogue that never loses sight of the heart of our design work: the content.

2. Better collaboration between designers, and between designers and developers
As design has taken a greater and more influential role in shaping businesses, more and more attention has been paid to designers’ collaboration with both their fellow designers, and their developer colleagues.

The emphasis on designer collaboration has arisen in part from the massiveness of the web and mobile apps we’re building these days. Gigantic platforms like Google, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn require not only huge design teams working on disparate aspects of the platform, but also better ways for designers to stay on the same page — and that means more collaboration, and better communication.

All kinds of tools have arisen to help facilitate that collaboration, from the shared templates and dashboards in Webflow’s Team plan to the real-time, shared canvas of Figma — and you can bet 2017 will bring both improvements to those platforms, and all-new options.

On the designer-developer collaboration front, lots of attention has been focused on the all-important handoff stage. Where designers used to hand off massive packages of static images and specs, they’re now sharing dynamic visualizations enabled by tools like InVision, Marvel, and UXPin — or doing one better by exporting real, production-ready code from Webflow.

As Carson Miller recently put it in his TechCrunch article “The future of front-end development is design”:

It is only a matter of time before design and prototyping tools replace front-end development altogether, seamlessly producing a high-quality front-end code base for your framework of choice.
And at Webflow, that’s a future we can get behind. Because we’re helping build it.

3. Improved design-to-development workflows
As design and prototyping tools for the web gain maturity and sophistication, the traditional handoff deliverable has transformed from the aforementioned static files to more dynamic visualizations that range from animated Keynote files to fully functional websites. These more dynamic deliverables shorten the feedback loop, simultaneously improving design and dev team agility and lowering frustration. They also facilitate better communication with clients. In fact, for many users of Webflow, client meetings have become actual live working sessions, where designers are able to quickly bring ideas to life so everyone can experience them almost immediately.

Next up, product designer Gadzhi Kharkharov:


‍‍Gadzhi Kharkharov, Product Designer
4. Big, bold type
As the design world comes to the consensus that our focus should be on content, more and more websites feature lines of resonant, inspiring copy set in type that’s just as big and bold as the statement itself.


‍The #MadeInWebflow Heco Partners

‍Pomerleau

‍Framer
As you’ll have noticed from the sample screenshots, “big” and “bold” doesn’t necessarily refer to the weight of the font! Rather, it’s about dedicating significant screen real estate to a single, simple yet all-encompassing statement about the product or service. And, refreshingly, a lot of these statements seem clear and to-the-point, free of the bloviated claims to disruption and greatness we’ve seen a lot of lately. (Okay, “design the impossible” might be bloviated, granted.)

In a world that’s as fast, busy, and information-overloaded as ours is, these concise yet powerful statements will become bread-and-butter for companies of all kinds.

5. Complex layouts rooted in graphic design principles
If we want to predict the evolution of web design (at least in visual terms), we should refer to the evolution of graphic design.

For the past few years, web design layout has been constrained by CSS’s limitations, but new tools like flexbox and CSS grid (coming in March 2017!) will allow for much more expressive layouts on the web.

Our main challenge now: understanding how these new web layout methods should work in the world of responsive design.

You can see some examples of what we can expect here (as long as you’re using a browser that supports CSS grid, like Firefox Nightly, Safari Technical Preview, or Chrome Canary):

The Experimental Layout Lab of Jen Simmons
Note the Merz-esque style of her hero section, a clear callback to graphic design’s evolution, and its ongoing conversation with aesthetic movements.


Grid by Example
Head to the Learn Grid Layout page for more examples.


6. More SVGs
SVGs (scalable vector graphics) present web designers and developers with a lot of advantages over more traditional image formats like JPG, PNG, and GIF.

The key advantages of SVGs come through loud and clear in the format name itself: scalable and vector. Instead of being raster or pixel-based, SVGs are composed of vectors: mathematical descriptions of the object’s shape. This means SVGs are resolution-independent, so they’ll look great on any screen, on any device type. No need to worry about making everything retina-ready.

But that’s not all. SVGs also rock because they don’t require any HTTP requests. And if you’ve ever run a page-speed test on one of your websites, you’ve probably noticed that those HTTP requests can really slow down your site. Not so with SVGs!

Plus, you can animate them!

Now let’s hear from product designer Nathan Romero.


‍‍Nathan Romero, Product Designer
7. Constraint-based design tools

Responsive design has completely transformed how we browse and build for the web.

But, oddly, it hasn’t really changed how design tools work, in general. With obvious exceptions like Webflow, most of the popular design tools require you to simply rebuild the same screen over and over for different device sizes and resolutions.

In an industry that’s all about rapid development, ideation, and launches, that massive time sink just isn’t sustainable.

Hence a new wave of design tools (such as Figma) that use the idea of constraints to lessen the amount of repeated work designers have to do when building cross-device layouts. These tools focus on the spatial relationships between elements and strive to preserve them as composite elements are resized by devices and users.

Less work for designers for the win.

And now, over to Ryan Morrison, senior visual designer. 


‍Ryan Morrison, Senior Visual Designer
8. More and brighter color
As movements like minimalism and brutalism came to the fore in 2016, designers sought ways to infuse more personality into their design work that still worked within those stripped-down aesthetics.

And in at least a few cases, bright, bold color became the natural answer.

Witness Asana’s color-drenched redesign.


And the much-derided, but undoubtedly brand-revivifying, Instagram app icon redesign.


Not to mention just about everything Stripe does.


As you can see, it’s not just about bright, enthusiastic color either. Gradients also came back in a big way, blending and blurring those exuberant hues into spectra reminiscent of a noonday sky or a splashy sunset.

There’s a sort of synthesized naturalism to this reemergence of bright hues and bold gradients, and I personally look forward to seeing more of it in 2017.

Though maybe we could turn the brightness back down below 11 this time around? Looking at you, Asana.

9. More focus on animation
Animation has long played a key role in our digital interfaces, and there’s no reason to think that’ll abate in 2017. In fact, as designers get more and more visual tools to help them build engaging and smile-sparking animations, we’re sure to see them become both more prominent and more refined.

The latter characteristic will become particularly important as it becomes easier to create animations. At 2016’s Design & Content Conference, animation guru Val Head stressed that designers should look to their brand voice and tone documentation when building animations to ensure that they reinforce the tone content creators are aiming for. This helps ensure that animations perform meaningful, on-brand functions for users, instead of just inspiring migraines.

10. Unique layouts
The year 2016 — much like the last several years preceding it — featured an ongoing debate about web design either dying, or losing its soul.

Overdramatic as the web-design-is-dead argument may be, you can’t blame any creative for seeking innovative ways to present content to readers. And one of the most enticing methods for breaking out of the box-centric layouts many blame responsive design for is the broken grid.

This approach seeks a way out of the meticulously aligned and “boxy” layouts we’ve been seeing a lot of lately with a variety of what might seem like visually jarring techniques. These include:

Overlapping typographical and graphical elements, as seen on…

The Outline

Bauhaus-Archiv

Seemingly random image and text placements, as seen on …

Epicurrence

Heco Partners

Next up, Nelson Abalos, Jr., customer support hero and host of the Webflow Workshops


‍Nelson Abalos, Jr., aka, Mr. Workshops
11. Flexbox
If you haven’t dived into flexbox yet, you’re in for a treat. This relatively “new” CSS layout module offers both incredible responsive-friendliness in its functionality, but also makes a lot of sense to visual designers used to manipulating objects on the canvas with the align and distribute tools offered in the likes of Sketch and Illustrator.

And with every modern browser (and no, I’m not counting IE11) now fully supporting flexbox, there’s no reason not to dive in — as long as your audience isn’t full of IE diehards.

Of course, flexbox can take some getting used to if you’re super comfortable with the other, very different layout modules. So if you need some help wrapping your head around flexible boxes, check out Flexbox Game.

Okay, what do you think, Waldo Broodryk, customer happiness hero?


‍Waldo Broodryk, Customer Happiness Beard ... I mean, Hero
12. Complex CSS grid layouts
Coming up hot on the heels of flexbox in the race for newer, better layout modules is CSS grid. As Chris House, creator of “A Complete Guide to Grid” puts it:

Grid is the very first CSS module created specifically to solve the layout problems we've all been hacking our way around for as long as we've been making websites.

While flexbox helps us solve some seriously aggravating and long-standing web design problems like vertical centering, it really wasn’t intended for use in full-page layouts. (Though it’s certainly capable of them.) Grid, on the other hand, was built for full-page layouts. And like flexbox, it allows you to easily rearrange content order for different media queries.

Grid isn’t yet ready for use in the wild, but that just gives you some time to familiarize yourself with the spec. Which is great, because it’s going to be big.

If you want to start playing with CSS grid today, here’s how:

In Chrome, go to chrome://flags and enable "experimental web platform features”
In Opera, go to opera://flags and enable "experimental web platform features”
In Firefox, enable the layout.css.grid.enabled (or install Firefox Nightly)
13. A focus on designing for content delivery, personalization, and conversion
One consequence of an increased focus on design as a means of effectively delivering content will be a stress on delivering said content to the right person at the right time — all with an eye to increasing desired actions, naturally. (All good news for you content strategists out there!)

Personalization of content has been an extremely hot topic in content circles for quite some time now, but no one seems to have perfectly cracked that nut yet. Essentially, the goal is to  serve up content based on characteristics like:

Demographics: Who is the visitor (professionally and/or personally) and where are they coming from?
Behavior: What is the visitor doing now? What have they done on your site in the past?
Context: What device and browser is the visitor using? How did they arrive at your site? Are they logged in or logged out?
We’ve seen some interesting experiments in this direction across the web, many of which revolve around a manual personalization of content recommendations by the user, recommendation of “related” reads, and some algorithmic solutions more akin to what Facebook is capable of doing.

Fubiz features manual personalization through its “Creativity Finder,” a conversational-style form that lets you pick from a range of predetermined options about you, your location, and what you’re looking for. It’s a bit “low tech,” but it does offer a feeling of agency most content platforms don’t really offer.

Fubiz

Redshift
A step up from that is Autodesk’s new Redshift blog, which deepens the level of user agency by offering a range of manual customization options like:

Following topics and authors
Customizable feed
Highlighting for comments and sharing
Bookmarking

It’s mostly stuff a savvy reader can achieve on their own, but Redshift dramatically simplifies those functions. And more importantly, it represents a shift away from a paradigm that views blog posts as the content version of vaporware, turning it into more of an evergreen learning resource.

If a lot of Redshift’s functionality sounds familiar, it might be because it’s largely replicated from Medium. Unlike Redshift, though, Medium has the advantage of a much larger base of readers and writers, not to mention tight integration with Twitter — all of which boost its ability to algorithmically recommend content to you.

All of these content personalization methods epitomize a view of product design as a method of finding the intersection between user needs and business needs. Readers want to be able to save, share, and customize the content they see — and the company can use that data in a host of ways. So, win-win.

Of course, it’s worth remembering that conversions aren’t the only metric content personalization can drive. Personalization of help documentation can help lower support request volume. Educational materials can lower churn and improve lifetime value. But it’s not like conversions will ever not be valuable.

And now for my two cents:


Hi!
14. More focus on conversation (yes, bots, but also...)
You might call 2016 the year of the bot — though whether it’s been the beginning of the bots’ triumph or just a somewhat underwhelming launch is very much open to debate.

That said, if the volume of bot-related launches on Product Hunt and Google’s deep integration of Assistant into Android are any indication, 2017’s going to see a lot more bots popping up across your life.

But bots are really just a specific instantiation of a more abstract, and thus more pervasive, idea: that conversation is an interface. And we’re likely to see that idea shape a lot of 2017’s top design work.

What this might mean, exactly, we’ll have to wait and see. But possible impacts include:

An even greater interest in “human” language (more good news for content strategists!)
Increased capacities for writers and content strategists to act as UX designers and bot developers
Even more investment in so-called “user-generated content,” creative communities, fora, etc.
More conversational/natural-language forms (at present, the form is the fundamental unit of product design — in 2017, we might see that paradigm shift from form to conversation)
Attempts to transform the comment section from the internet’s sewer into fonts of “engagement” and new content — an effort already kicked off by the Coral Project
Hopefully, this continued interest in bots and AIs will help them better understand what the hell we’re talking about.

15. The fight against fake news

‍Illustration by New Yorker cartoonist Joe Dator.
The 2016 U.S. presidential campaign taught us all a lot about how the web can influence sociopolitical realities, and one of the foremost lessons was:

Misinformation is fast, easy, and cheap to produce; super profitable; and capable of severely impacting public perception of candidates.  

Obviously not something that (most of us) who create and distribute web content were excited to see revealed.

But every problem represents an opportunity. And true to form, web designers, product designers, and developers worldwide have jumped at the opportunity to fix this particular broken window. Here's just a small sampling:

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg called the percentage of fake news “relatively small,” but went on to outline 7 steps Facebook is taking to help fight misinformation.
A group of university students has built a Chrome plugin called FiB that labels news stories as “verified” or “unverified” right inside the Facebook UI.
Google and Facebook have both stated that they’ll limit the flow of ad dollars to fake news sites via their advertising tools.
Popular Twitter account Saved You A Click launched a spinoff called Saved You A Trick to identify fake news stories.
Ultimately, the more programmatic methods and monetary methods proposed by Facebook, Google, and the FiB team will prove the most scalable and effective. But more human methods like a stronger commitment to journalistic ethics and tools and resources designed to help people be better readers will undoubtedly be needed as well.

Because as with any attempt to control the flow of information, there’s always the possibility of control being exercised the wrong way. And that means it’s ultimately up to us to stop the creation and spread of misinformation.

16. More peeks inside design (and content)
Over the course of 2016, a number of design teams created and popularized their own blogs as a way to offer insights into process and, perhaps, humanize the brand to a certain extent.

Content like this used to be focused primarily on recruitment — attracting new hires by conveying a sense of what’s it like to design, or engineer, or write within a particular company. 

But in 2016, the focus appeared to shift in 3 new directions:

Brand
Humanization
Helpfulness
These 3 strains can be pretty hard to untangle, and the most popular of these design blogs do all three with panache. They also tend to have a particular focus that sets them apart as more than “Brand X’s design team blog.” But again, it’s not always obvious.

With the success of the following design-and-content blogs, brace yourself for many more in 2017:

Facebook.design
Foci: Process and tools


Several People Are Typing
Foci: Slack, workplace productivity, and content strategy


Google Design
Foci: Google, process, tools


Shopify UX
Foci: UX (i.e., design, content, dev, research)


17. A new designer deliverable — code — created in new ways
In his TechCrunch article “The future of front-end development is design,” Carson Miller writes:

Coding is going to look dramatically different in the future. In fact, the line between design and development may no longer exist.
A conversation about the article sprung up on Twitter, where Austin Knight noted:

Many designers and devs that I know would prefer to work visually, but work in code out of necessity.
There are many drivers behind this emerging reality, including

The need for fast, iterative product development
User need for more equivalency between outputs and inputs (i.e., most painters don’t paint with code)
Increasing sophistication of code-free design tools

18. Virtual reality … on the web
Given our already firmly founded tendency to think of the web as a kind of alternate reality, this is a bit inception-y. But there’s no denying that VR is going to affect the web in a big way in 2017 — even if browsers won’t be ready to support it. If you’re eager to try it, check out the Web VR site.


Friday, February 5, 2016, 10:55
Learning is constant. As web design professionals, you have to be constantly in the know about the latest trends and technologies in web design. Aside from those skills, you also need to develop other aspects of your life in order to achieve a good work-life balance in order to succeed.

That is why you might be surprised that a lot of these books in our list don't just focus about web design, but also about business, self-improvement, and more.
Here is our list of the best web design books from 2016 to draw inspiration as well as learn important principles from. You might have read some of them while others might be new to you. Pick one or a few of them from the list, sit in your favorite chair, or go to your own private space, and get ready to learn and be inspired.


1. Steal like an Artist: 10 Things Nobody Told You about Being Creative
This is a simple and quick read about getting inspiration and coming up with ideas. The book also tells you that inspiration is everywhere and creativity is for everyone, not just for the genius or multi-talented. It says that creativity doesn't necessarily mean being original, but a combination and collaboration of existing ideas and turning them into novel forms.

2. Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
Steve Krug tackles web usability and the interaction between humans and computers, stating that a website should allow users to accomplish what they want to do as easily and directly as possible. He also gives very helpful tips how a simple tweak can enhance a website's usability.

3. LinchPin: Are You Indispensable?
A linchpin, according to Seth Godin, is someone in an organization who is indispensable, valuable, and irreplaceable. This book teaches principles and ideas how to become a linchpin by becoming an artist who does emotional work. By emotional work, he explains, is work that matters to you, work that you are willing to sacrifice all other alternatives. When you do this, you become passionate and accountable to the choice you made.

4. Where Good Ideas Come from
Steven Johnson states that all useful inventions are good ideas. Then, he uses them to stimulate his readers' minds by asking where these good ideas come from and what kind of environment breeds them. He identifies seven key patterns that result in genuine innovation. What's interesting is his section on errors which lead to accidental innovations and inventions, such as the computer. One brilliant takeaway was his reminder about "being right keeps you in place, and being wrong forces us to explore."

5. Neuro Web Design: What Makes Them Click?
Susan Weinschenk talks about how various website features affect the user's brain. She stated that our buying decision is greatly influenced by our unconscious – based on our emotions and automatic triggers. This insight greatly helps a web designer how they should design the website, and how they should combine and incorporate all other features that will influence the consumers' unconscious and increase conversion.

6. Everything I Know
Paul Jarvis needs no introduction in our 1WD community, and we know that his ideas are golden nuggets not only to web designers but to almost everyone. The book reflects his personality as he combines different interesting anecdotes in his freelancing career with practical tips and ideas to help you conquer your fear and reach your highest potential not only as a person but also as a web design professional. He also challenges his readers to embrace vulnerability, be true to yourself, and settle for nothing less.

7. Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action
It's not really about web design, but about leadership. Simon Sinek answers the question why some people and organizations more influential, innovative, and profitable than others. He used several examples of people who stand out – the Wright brothers, Steve Jobs, and Martin Luther King were just a few. They are no different from others, nor are their ideas, but why did they stand out? One reason Sinek gave was their ability to inspire and motivate others. If you want to stand out as a web designer, this is a must read for you.

8. Mobile Design Book
This is a book by designers for designers. If you are also into mobile app development, then this is a good read. The book talks about mobile design principles that make apps successful. it's not limited to operating systems, as web design is evolving, we're having responsive design, not an option but a must, principles in the book will help you understand how to design websites for smaller screens

9. Design for Hackers: Reverse Engineering Beauty
A comprehensive guide about design principles and elements, from the purpose of design to color. David Kadavy used "hacker" as a reference to a "renegade group of entrepreneurial-minded people who are changing how we work, live, and interact. He adds that a hacker strives to learn in order to achieve his vision, is curious, and is entrepreneurial, just as we often encourage members of the 1WD community.

10. Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products
One of the goals web designers want to achieve for their clients is to increase website conversion. In this book, Nir Eyal helps you achieve that by teaching you to look at underlying patterns in technology and how they are utilized to hook us. Once you become aware of these patterns, you can incorporate them into your design to enhance user experience and increase conversion.

11. Choose Yourself
How often have you made mistakes as a web designer? Mistakes are inevitable, and they are necessary. When it comes to mistakes, James Altucher is no stranger to them, using them as examples in this book to encourage his readers that these are normal and feeling like a failure at some point is also normal. However, when you begin to choose yourself for success, when you're honest and open about the real you and your authentic passions, you jumpstart your success.

12. The Smashing Book #4 – New Perspectives on Web Design (Smashing Special eBooks)
If it's from Smashing Magazine, it must be something good, right? Right. This fourth eBook installment talks about the mistakes most websites make and a solution for each of them. The content is easy to understand and provides priceless input about web design perspectives.

13. The Design of Everyday Things: Revised and Expanded Edition
This is a very old book written 25 years ago, but its content and principles remain relevant even until today. Don Norman talks about the relationship between design and human interaction. He also gives important lessons on the concepts of discoverability, affordance, signifiers, feedbacks, mappings and constraints.

14. Designing Web Interfaces: Principles and Patterns for Rich Interactions
This book provides information how to create great user experiences. Bill Scott and Theresa Neil were instrumental in designing UX for Yahoo and Netflix for years, so they know what they are talking about when they say UX. Here, they present more than 75 design patterns for building web interfaces that provide rich interaction. So if you're looking for practical tips or just inspiration, you can start with this book.

15. The Principles of Beautiful Web Design
This book is another easy read and is ideal for those who are starting out as web designers. On the other hand, it can serve as a refresher on the basics of web design with topics that tackle color, typography, imagery, and texture. It also includes a lot of examples to make each point easier to understand and apply.

16. Creative Workshop: 80 Challenges to Sharpen Your Design Skills
Running out of inspiration? Creative workshop is full of exercises for practice and exploration to help you discover which processes work best for you. It is perfect for budding designers as well as for those who've been in the industry for a long time. Design agencies can use this to provide a challenge for the team.

17. Exceptional Service, Exceptional Profit: The Secrets of Building a Five-Star Customer Service Organization
As we often say here on 1WD, you are not just a web designer, but also an entrepreneur. This mindset is very important if you want to succeed and last in the industry. As a web designer, your clients are important, especially their loyalty. Why? Because loyal customers are less sensitive to price competition, more forgiving of small glitches, and, ultimately, become "walking billboards" who will happily promote your brand.

18. Adapt: Why Success Always Starts with Failure
Tim Harford boldly declares that there is no such thing as ready-made solutions. He said that even expert opinion isn't enough to help you tackle your problems. In short, we have to re-learn everything we know about solving problems – we need to ADAPT. This book tackles different issues we face in the present world and explains the necessary ingredients for turning failure into success. If you want to survive and prosper not only as a web designer, but in everything, this is a must-read.

19. A Practical Guide to Designing for the Web
Already a popular figure in the web community, Mark Boulton created a no-nonsense guide for designing websites using the principles of graphic design. Boulton explains the academics of typography, layout, colour theory and grids. For each theory he shows when and how this applies to the web, and even when to be crazy and break the rules to make it even better. Just make sure you learn the rules before you break them.

20. Universal Principles of Design
This is a great reference book written by William Lidwell. It is accompanied by images and explanations to help you better understand a lot of design concepts and principles, from the 80/20 rule to 100 different design concepts. The book has been translated to 16 languages.

21. HTML and CSS: Design and Build Websites
Most books about CSS and HTML are boring, even to web design professionals. Jon Duckett takes a fresh approach to make the book interesting without watering down the essential information you need to know about HTML and CSS. This is a good investment for those who really want to know about coding.

22. The Elements of Typographic Style
Want to know more about typography? This book by renowned typographer Robert Bringhurst gives you more insight to the beautiful art of typography. He explains the history and theory of typography along with practical examples. He also introduces new innovations and techniques in font technology, making this a must read for anyone who wants to integrate beautiful typefaces to their websites.

23. Responsive Design with WordPress
This book by Joe Casabona is for those who are trying to learn how to create repsonsive themes and plugins. A good read for those who are learning WordPress for the first time.

24. Bulletproof Web Design
Dan Cederholm, the author of Web Standard Solutions, brings yet another easy-to-read book on web design problems and offering ways how to solve them. Then, he delves deeper by pointing out the weaknesses and strengths of each solution, and offers a solution that follows the best practices. If there is no clear-cut solution to a certain problem, he candidly tells his readers and allows them to decide for themselves.

25. The Laws of Simplicity
John Maeda writes in the premise that "simplicity is sanity." He explains the 10 principles of simplicity which applies to almost any aspect of life, especially to product design. He advocates few buttons, few features, and few distractions while providing practical solutions and strategies to optimize the power of simplicity.

26. Good Strategy, Bad Strategy
If you have or are thinking to have a web design agency, this is a book to help you identify what good strategy is. The book says that most organizations don't have good strategy because, in the first place, they don't have one. Instead, most organizations have visions, or mistake financial goals for strategy, or have a hodge podge of conflicting policies and actions.

27. Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness
The book title says it all. From time to time, each of us needs a little nudge to make wise and better decisions. You might think that the book is irrelevant to you as a web designer, but you'll be surprised to find that there's more to it to help you as a web design professional.

28. The Tipping Point
This is another book that is not directly related to web design, but will surely broaden your perspective as a person and also great lessons you can apply as a web designer. One of them, as the title suggests, is how little things make a difference. Malcolm Gladwell also discusses how things become very difficult and reach a tipping point, but suddenly things turn around and start taking off.

29. Rework
Rework has received both good and bad reviews and both camps give "candid" reviews about the book. Reviews aside, the book draws some real-life experiences from the group that created Basecamp. They talk about changing how businesses are run and the tools they use to achieve the work. It also emphasizes that you can basically start a business by maximizing free tools available on the Web. A must-read if you're looome tips about building your business.

30. Made to Stick
Ideas come and go but there are some ideas stay with us for a long time. Why do these ideas stick? This is the question asked by Chip and Dan Heath in their book. They continue to explore the idea how to make ideas stick in people's consciousness. This is the same question web professionals, social media experts, and business owners ask themselves. This is the right book to find the answer to such questions.

31. Rocket Surgery Made Easy
This is another book by Steve Krug and some sort of a follow-up for his Don't Make Think book. Here, Steve Krug discusses how to test any design, find the most important problems, and provide the easiest solution for that problem. It encourages teams to test early and regularly so they can spot and fix the problem immediately while it is still manageable.

32. 100 Things Every Designer Should Know about People
Why do we design? This is the question that Susan Weinschenk tries to build upon in this book. She explains the real reason why we do what we do as web designers. That is to elicit response from people whether it is to buy more products, subscribe to an email, or read an article. She also explains how people see, feel, hear, and think as opposed to how designers undergo the same thoughts and processes.

33. Content Strategy for the Web
Content is king and good design with poor content makes a bad website. Furthermore, better content means better business. If you want to learn more how to create good content, this book offers a step-by-step of the production, process, implementation, and maintenance of your content.

34. Winning without Losing
The authors discuss the most common paradox of our times – working in the comforts of your home with just a click away, but working longer hours than necessary. They show us how to build a business and turn it into something sustainable and widely recognized while having a happy personal life on the other side. A very practical book which helps you identify and get rid of things that waste your time.

35. Selling the Invisible: A Field Guide to Modern Marketing
The book talks about the shift of the American economy from being a manufacturing one to becoming service-oriented. So what does it have to do with you as a web professional? The book offers a lot of wonderful, if not revolutionary, insights on not just being the best in your chosen field, but re-defining what best means. It also resonates with what we often talk about here on the 1WD community about selling to them relationships and not just your expertise.

36. Decoded: The Science Behind Why We Buy
It's a good reference book to get insight about user experience. It is not a book about UX but the principles it has can be used to help you improve that. It serves as a comprehensive bridge between marketing and decision science showing that understanding consumer behavior is the springboard to creativity.

37. Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion
A national bestseller by Robert Cialdini, Influence is the product of his research about influence and persuasion. Written in a casual, easy-to-understand tone, each chapter is filled with interesting information and practical examples about reciprocity, scarcity, liking, authority, social proof, and commitment. The book comes with a promise that you can even influence the most resistant audience after reading it.

38. Logo, Font & Lettering Bible
Author Lisa Cabarga challenges her readers why they should settle into using others' logos and typefaces when you can create your own. The book includes how to create innovative logo designs, design your custom-made fonts, and develop an eye for quality logo design and lettering.

39. Color Messages and Meaning
It is one of the most comprehensive guides to the science of color. The boo teaches you about color combinations and principles to help you create an effective design. Each point has relevant examples to help web design professionals from various levels of experience design better.

40. No Logo
The book is an observation to modern marketing trends, especially by big brands. Naomi Klein talks about how super brands have become more ubiquitous and taking over almost all public spaces including toilets, school curiculla, neighborhoods, and more.

41. The Truth About Getting Things Done
How do you succeed and achieve all your goals? The book answers that question by providing simple home truths including focusing on your time, make the most of your environment, and how to adopt a winning mindset. It's simple, plain, and powerful.

42. Designing for Performance: Weighing Aesthetics and Performance
Web designers are often faced with this dilemma – aesthetics or performance. The decision affects the website performance and load time. This is the problem the book addresses as it focuses on understanding of how page load time works, and what we can do to improve it and make the best overall user experience.

43. Responsible Responsive Design
This book teaches you how to turn a critical eye on your designs as you focus more on developing new contexts and features as well as speedy and lagging networks. It also teaches you how to tune your design to performance and serve the right content across platforms.

44. Professional Website Performance: Optimizing the Front-end and Back-end
The book says, and we agree, that for website development to become effective, it requires optimum performance from both web browser and server. Unlike other books in this list, you might want to take time digesting awesome information you find here. Some of it deal with load balancing and scaling while some explain how HTML, CSS, JavaScript works in the browser and how we as developers can take advantage of that for optimization purposes.

45. Prioritizing Web Usability
The author, Jakob Nielsen, is considered as one of the leading experts in web usability. He also talks about the importance of your homepage and the average time users spend on it and what can be done to improve the user experience.

46. Letting Go of the Words
Another book that emphasizes on the importance of good content. Janice Reddish, the author of the book, is a linguist by training and has been helping people build websites that couple good design and well-written content. So here is an expert that knows what she is talking about. The book offers great tactics and strategies to help you have good conversations throughout your website from beginning to end.

47. Information Architecture for the World Wide Web
The book consists of two parts – the first part consists of theory and the second part is filled with practical examples which helps you use information architecture effectively. It is a must read for web developers who especially build large websites.

48. Big Brand Theory
The Big Brand Theory looks into different successful global brands and dissects each element and feature which makes the brand successful. The author's examination of each branding concept is multi-faceted and does not focus on only one area giving you useful insight about branding.

49. Making and Breaking the Grid: A Graphic Design Layout Workshop
The book presents the use of grid which the learning designer can use to utilize elements once thought as simple and static in ways which add dynamism to your layouts. Although not a radical book, Making and Breaking the Grid is full of ideas regarding the most powerful aspects of communication design.

50. UI is Communication
A lot of designers will agree that User Interface is one tricky activity that requires an understanding of different concepts. The author provides a lot of exercises to emphasize each point.

 


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8 New Design Trends that must be considred in 2017


BY RYAN MCCREADY - 2017

 
So we’re already into 2017, in case you haven’t noticed. That means you probably have already broken one of your New Year’s resolutions. Don’t worry, my resolution to get better sleep has already been dashed.

But one of my resolutions that I will not be breaking is to become a better graphic designer in 2017. And this is great news for you, because I will help you also become a better designer in the process.

If you have read any of my other articles, you’ll know that I am not a traditionally trained graphic designer. I am, instead, a writer who enjoys design enough to immerse myself in it and learn all that I can, using simple graphic design software to help me along the way. And that quest continues into this new year.

A great place to start is to see what the graphic design world will look like this year, and what trends will take it by storm. And we think that 2017 will reject some of the past graphic design trends completely.

It is going to be an interesting year, to say the least. This guide will prepare you for those changes.

Graphic Design Trends You Should Know for 2017:


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